Why Choose an Infrared Thermometer over Conventional Methods?

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Infrared thermometers (also called pyrometers) operate on the principle of detecting infrared radiation of objects to determine the temperature. Pyrometers are useful for controlling complete factory processes or measuring small components to ensure a consistent quality level.

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LumaSense Pyrometer Launched into Space!

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We are very excited to share that our Japanese partner Hazama Sokki notified us that our IGA 140-TV pyrometer launched into space!

The pyrometer launched on August 19th as part of the HTV5 cargo mission from the Tanegashima Space Center and arrived at the International Space Station (ISS) on August 24th! As part of Japan’s Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) Electrostatic Levitation Furnace (ELF), the pyrometer will help scientists gather data on high temperature melts. ELF can use the zero-gravity environment to levitate a sample, control the position with electrostatic force, and then heat it to above 2000 °C.

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The Convergence of Precision with Visualization – Pyrometry Meets Imaging Halfway…and Why It’s a Big Deal for Industrials

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In our last post, Brett explained why LumaSense is exploring innovations that wed the well-known arena of pyrometry with thermal infrared (IR) imaging. Emerging from our customer-driven R&D efforts is a new area of temperature measurement and control—a potentially transformative technology that we call Rel-Rad™.

To understand why Rel-Rad is so transformative, I thought it would be useful to take a brief snapshot of the current state of pyrometry and thermal imaging and explain where Rel-Rad fits.

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Sensing the Forest Through the Trees

tree_4As I blogged before the Fourth of July took us home to friends and family, LumaSense Technologies’ collaborative 6th Sense approach consists of six steps that effectively put companies on the path to rooting out waste and inefficiency.

Some may consider an efficiency improvement of 1-4% to be modest and not worth the effort required. But when you’re competing with companies on an international scale, every improvement affects the bottom line. If you could make transformational and enduring improvements to achieve world-class efficiency and reduce unwarranted waste, then why not?

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